‘Spring into action’ in the garden!

Spring is emerging; the evenings are getting lighter, the sun has come out of hibernation, daffodils are springing up in Cornwall, and other signs of life are starting to appear across the landscape.

The pent-up angst and frustration of gardeners across the county following such a poor year in 

2012, is certainly ready for release, and ‘springing into action’ in the garden, encouraged by all with a passionate connection to the garden, and with hope of a better year in 2013. The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) is one keen supporter of kick-starting the gardening season with its national ‘Spring into Summer’ Campaign, aiming to encourage gardeners to transform their gardens through colour, scent and wildlife, through spring and into summer.
 

So what can we be getting on with in the coming weeks? Trevena Cross Nurseries near Helston tells us:

Managing lawn and weed growth…

Dig the lawnmower out in March and begin regular cutting on the highest blade setting, on dry days (when the ground isn’t wet or frozen). Now is the time to get on top of weeds that start to appear too. Assistance from Round Up or Resolva Weedkiller can help.

Planting potatoes, sets & bulbs…
We’re generally a few weeks ahead of the rest of the country with our sowing and planting here in Cornwall, due to milder temperatures, so if you haven’t got your early seed potatoes, garlic and onion sets planted out yet, do so now. Plant your summer flowering bulbs too.

Dividing and re-planting crowded perennials…
Perennials generally need dividing and re-planting every few years – it encourages healthy growth, and of course, gives you new plants for free! Signs that it’s time to interfere include a perennial that has grown too big for its space, has lost its shape, or that flowered poorly last year. Dividing should take place while the plant is still dormant, so now is a good time.

Pruning shrubs and bushes…
Improve shape and encourage new growth, blooms and fruits this coming season. Use sharp, clean tools and make clean cuts above new growth/buds. Excessively long shoots, weak or damaged growth should be a priority.

Treating pots, beds & borders…
Top dress pots and containers with fresh compost. Remove old compost and top up with new if there isn’t much room for more on top. A good mulch of compost or bark on beds and borders will also be appreciated once pruning, de-weeding and debris removal has taken place. The application of a balanced fertiliser like bonemeal root builder or fish, blood & bone feed will also benefit young, weak, damaged or heavily pruned plants in particular.

Kick-starting the grow-your-own garden…
Feed fruit trees and soft fruit bushes, applying nitrogen feed to hungry trees in particular, like plums, cherries, pears, and blackcurrants. Mulch all with organic farmyard manure. It’s also a key time for strawberries – cover established plants with a cloche, plant cold-stored runners, and pollinate strawberry flowers under glass by brushing them with your hands. Various veg can now also be sown outside, including lettuces, leeks, radishes, carrots and parsnips.

Regularly updated gardening tips, to assist you with your gardening activities this coming season, can be found in the ‘Knowledge Centre’ on Trevena Cross 

Nurseries website www.trevenacross.co.uk

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Upcoming Events

  • Self-drive garden visits

    Prideaux Place, Padstow PL28 8RP  - Our President, Elisabeth Prideaux-Brune and her husband, Peter are offering us a special opportunity to visit their magnificent Elizabethan mansion that has been home to 14 generations of the Prideaux-Brune family. Having survived the Elizabethan, Georgian and Victorian eras, the gardens became a wilderness after the Second World War so an on-going restoration programme aims to return them to their former glory. With one of the oldest deer parks in the country and stunning views across the Camel Estuary, this is your chance to see an 80-tree lime avenue, remodelled formal Victorian garden, hornbeam (Carpinus betulas) allée and Acer glade.

    Wellgarth Plants, Bodmin (Sorry no postcode for this field) - Cassie Corby runs Wellgarth Plants, a specialist daylily (Hemerocallis) nursery that stocks hundreds of unusual varieties of these long-flowering perennials. Few can be purchased elsewhere in the UK and today’s modern hybrids combine more exquisite colour choices. Cassie will tell us how easy it is to grow and propagate these low maintenance hardy plants, which will be available to buy on the day.

    The booking form will be included in our June 2017 mailing.   

  • Self-drive garden visits

    Crugsillick​ Manor, Ruan High Lanes, Truro TR2 5LJ  - This is a wonderful late summer treat. Crugsillick is a lovely old house in an inspirational setting. The garden has been re-landscaped with a large pond and exotic flowering trees and shrubs on several levels. It has wonderful views, a kitchen garden, yew hedges and paths which define the oval lawns and broad mixed borders.

    Rosteague, Portscatho, Truro TR2 5EF -  This is a fantastic opportunity to visit Rosteague, an ancient manor house in a magical setting, with its lawns, flowerbeds and farmland rolling down to the sea. The 17th century French garden is its crowning glory with four large geometrical parterres of intricate box (Buxus sempervirens) hedging and topiary, sheltered by stone walls, which make it an interesting place to explore.

    The booking form will be included in our June 2017 mailing.